graphics

7) Trying to Illustrate a Bible Story? Get these Free Images

If you’re a creative arts professional (or you do presentations about the Bible), you probably know how hard it is to create and/or find images of certain Bible stories. Well now, you have a lot more going for you. Just visit…

 

freebibleimages.org/

 

and you’ll find 790 complete Bible story sets (about the most common Bible characters and values). Odds are, you’ll find SOMETHING or SOMEONE in these preconfigured images that will work for you! (Thanks for the tip, Mike!)

6) Illustrate Your Story — Visual.ly

I remain committed to learning how to use visuals, such as those at…

http://visual.ly/?view=explore

to tell our stories. And with Visual.ly, at least I don’t have to be a professional informational graphic artist to churn out useful and interesting charts. I just need some time… and apparently not money. If you’re still wondering what IS Visually, check out the video at…

http://youtu.be/sCmO8YKzv9U

Basically, it’s a place to create, share and explore great visualizations — which is cool for anyone writing or publishing reports, web stories, fundraising appeals, and more. Which is basically YOU. :-) (Thanks for pointing me to Visual.ly, Caleb.)

12) I Want to Learn Piktochart

Has anyone else tried Piktochart? I’m dying to get some time to learn how to do this… and then snag the time to put it to use. Sometimes, I long to stop time so I can go hide out somewhere and spend about 6 months just learning to DO something… and Piktochart would be one of the first. I can’t even describe it — except to say … it’s a way to build cool drawings on the web that can then be used in a variety of formats in a host of applications. Yes, it’s costly (about $1/day), but there are people who buy a coffee every day, you know? And aren’t those sometimes 99 cents each? So… if I were a coffee drinker, Piktochart would make me want to give it up. :-)

Try a free account. Nothing to lose. Except your coffee. :-)

19) Find a Camera/Kit

Find a camera you can carry, then *use* it. Making the choice — now that’s the tricky part. For example, I was hauled into the back of a swat truck once in Uruguay because, unbeknownst to me, policemen were making a drug bust in the market I was photographing. I think they concluded I was working for some magazine or something because the camera I was using had one of those long telephoto lenses on the front. It was too high profile. My suggestion is – carry a camera that’s comfortable and practical for you, but beware of equipment that raises your profile unnecessarily. Right now, I’m using a Canon PowerShot G7. It’s one of those unique cameras that has essentially all the settings of a single-lense reflex, without the look of one; in fact, it carries reasonably well in my jacket or vest pocket, completely out of sight. But it’s probably too much camera if you’re not the type to study the owner’s manual. Again, the secret is to find something that works well. Read reviews online. When you notice that a friend or co-worker is producing great results, ask her what she uses, then see if that would work for you. And once you find something you like, stick with it — and *use* it. That means you’ll probably a little tripod to stick in your backpack or vest pocket. It’s the only way you’ll get shots with *you* in them (using the self-timer). My carry tripod is so light, I barely know it’s in one of my right vest pockets. It’s probably just 6″ long, but it’s generally all I need to capture a shot of a luncheon meeting or a time-exposure of a church building at night. I sacrifice a bit by carrying a rather powerful external flash. Those built-in on-board flashes are great if you’re only taking snapshots up to 11′ away. To capture all those new believers at 10pm, you’ll need something stronger. Get a flash attachment with a head that you can pivot upwards to “bounce” the flash off the ceiling so it illuminates the entire room. That’s the way to get a really pleasing picture at night without all the glare in your subject’s eyes.

3) Where Does One Buy Signage/Displays

Wes is looking for the best value on printed graphic banners for tabletop displays. He had previously ordered 30 at less than $30 each from a vendor called Designs2go. However, recently the price has more than doubled to $65 each. If you had to try to beat that price and find a great quality vendor, where would you go? If possible, jot down your favorite option by clicking “Comment” below.

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